About CPNI

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CPNI - the policy context

Policy considerations are one of the building blocks for CPNI's protective security advice. There are various Government policies which impact our work.

1. National Security Strategy

The UK Government's National Security Strategy sets out the strategic choices on ensuring the UK's security and resilience.

Acts of terrorism and hostile attacks in UK cyber space are two of the highest priority risk types identified in the strategy that need to be addressed.

2. Strategic Defence and Security Review

The Strategic Defence and Security Review sets out how the objectives of the National Security Strategy are to be pursued. These include:

  • ensuring that our key counter-terrorist capabilities are maintained and in some areas enhanced, while still delivering efficiency gains,
  • developing a transformative programme for cyber security, which addresses threats from states, criminals and terrorists, and seizes the opportunities which cyber space provides for our future prosperity and for advancing our security interests.

3. Counter terrorism strategy

The UK Government's counter terrorism strategy (known as CONTEST) aims to reduce the risk from international terrorism so that people can go about their business freely and with confidence. Developing and delivering CONTEST involves stakeholders from across government departments, the emergency services, voluntary organisations, the business sector and partners from across the world.  The strategy is divided into four principal strands: Prevent, Pursue, Protect and Prepare. CPNI's work falls within the Protect strand, which is concerned with reducing the vulnerability of the UK and UK interests overseas to a terrorist attack.

4. Cyber Security Strategy

The UK’s Cyber Security Strategy was published in November 2011. It sets out how the UK will support economic prosperity, protect national security and safeguard the public’s way of life through building a more trusted and resilient digital environment. In particular it highlights the crucial role of closer partnership between the public sector and the private sector.

To mark the second anniversary of the strategy the Cabinet Office have published a list of achievements against the objectives and a forward plan.

You can view the full statement and other associated documents on gov.uk.

5. National Risk Register

The most significant emergencies that the United Kingdom and its citizens could face over the next five years are monitored by Government through the National Risk Assessment (NRA). This is a confidential assessment that is conducted annually, drawing on expertise from a wide range of departments and agencies of government. The National Risk Register (NRR) is the public version and the 2010 edition reflects the latest iteration of the National Risk Assessment. 

The NRA and NRR capture events which could result in significant harm to human welfare: casualties, damage to property, essential services and disruption to everyday life. The risks cover three broad categories: natural events, major accidents and malicious attacks.

6. Resilience of infrastructure from natural hazards

The Civil Contingencies Secretariat within the Cabinet Office has developed a cross-sector Critical Infrastructure Resilience Programme (CIRP), with the aim of improving the resilience of critical infrastructure and essential services to severe disruption from natural hazards. The process, timetable and expectations for the programme are detailed in its Strategic Framework and Policy statement.


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