Security advice

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Physical security

Physical security measures aim to either prevent a direct assault on premises or reduce the potential damage and injuries that can be inflicted should an incident occur.

For most organisations the recommended response will involve a sensible mix of general good housekeeping alongside appropriate investments in CCTV, intruder alarms and lighting that deter as well as detect – measures that will also protect against other criminal acts such as theft and vandalism and address general health and safety concerns.

In some locations these measures may already be in place to some degree. However, external and internal threats to organisations (and their staff) will constantly evolve and so all procedures and technology should be kept under constant review.

Before designing a physical security scheme, it is recommended that security practitioners read the "Guide to producing operational requirements" (see Related Documents). An Operational Requirement (OR) is a statement of need based upon a thorough and systematic assessment of the problem to be solved and the hoped for solutions.

Producing an OR is a mandatory requirement of the Cabinet Office - Security Policy Framework (SPF) and is a process that has been successfully applied across the UK national infrastructure.

CBR

Since the early 1990s, concern that terrorists might use chemical, biological and radioactive (CBR) materials as weapons has increased steadily.

CBR

CCTV

CCTV should form only part of a whole security system; it should not be used on its own. It cannot replace security staff, although it may permit a reduction in their number or their redeployment to other security activities.

CCTV

Explosives and ballistics protection

Most terrorist bombs are improvised and so are known as improvised explosive devices (IEDs). If you believe your business or organisation might become the target of a bomb attack, you should assess the threat and potential damage and plan how to prevent or mitigate it.

Explosives and ballistics protection

Hostile Vehicle Mitigation (HVM)

Vehicle-borne threats range from vandalism to sophisticated or aggressive attacks by determined criminals or terrorists. The mobility and payload capacity of a vehicle offers a convenient delivery mechanism for a large explosive device. The HVM section contains policy and good practice guidance that will help practitioners to determine the vehicle-borne threat, assess site strengths and vulnerabilities, and provide options for HVM.

Hostile Vehicle Mitigation (HVM)

Lighting

Lighting can be an important security measure, but may in fact assist an intruder if used incorrectly.

Lighting

Perimeters and access control

Keep access points to a minimum and make sure the boundary between public and private areas of your building is secure and clearly signed. Invest in good quality access controls such as magnetic swipe identification cards or 'proximity' cards which are readable from a short distance.

Perimeters and access control

Secure destruction of sensitive items

The destruction of sensitive items should be undertaken via a secure process. This section provides those responsible for information assurance and physical security with best practice guidance on the need for a secure destruction process, the development of robust procedures, and approved destruction equipment manufacturers and service providers.

Secure destruction of sensitive items

Search and screening – explosives and weapons detection

Organisations may use search and screening measures to detect specific items and materials entering (or leaving) their buildings and sites; effective search and screening measures may additionally have a significant deterrent effect.

Search and screening – explosives and weapons detection

CPNI trademark

The CPNI trademark identifies products which have been assured by CPNI.

CPNI trademark

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